Tuesday, 17 September 2019

INTERVIEW // We talk to Australian music producer Sult, where he shines a 'Viral Light' on his life

“Sult” is the electronic manifestation of 26 year old Australian, Luke Andersen. An emerging, experimental producer, who has progressed through a diverse range of music and sub-genres in the past. Only recently, discovering his niche and ultimately, his innate desire and motivation to develop the sound he’d envisioned since 2014. Somewhere just left field of driving techno stompers and slightly northeast of melodic and progressive house lies Sult’s production. Sult is the co-creator of Flux nightclub, at Phillip Island, Victoria. Where he and his brother, BANDO, host a variety of International, Domestic and local artists each Summer. Regularly opening and closing the decks at his home town for a variety of established producers, including, but not limited to Kaiser Souzai, Gabriel Moraes and Kase Kochen.

We had the incredible opportunity to have a chat to Sult where we spoke a little about him and his music.

At what point in your life did you have that moment where you said to yourself "This is it. This is the type of music I want to create?"
It was 2013 / 14. At the time I had little understanding of the basics of music production or the determination to pursue it. I was in complete awe of the releases from Boris Brejcha, Victor Ruiz and Alex Stein and the powerful leads that came with them. As Victor and Alex veered away from bass-heavy, Brazilian tech house into grittier, heavier techno territory, my own tastes were evolving simultaneously.

Now I'm inspired by the likes of  SAMA, Mario Ochoa, UMEK, Loco & Jam and Thomas Schumacher to name a few.


Please list some of your favourite genres that you enjoy listening to in your spare time?
I mostly listen to alternative rock and techno but I’m pretty open-minded to most genres. Anything besides commercial trash, disco and big room trash.


What key pieces of gear/software are you using to define your sound?
For me, the biggest key to my sound development at the moment is Massive by Native Instruments. However, I'm in the process of heavily expanding my library of synths, hardware and plugins. I've just this weekend purchased myself a Komplete Kontrol S49 to compliment my production. The next expensive piece I'm itching for is Omnisphere 2.5.


What inspires you outside of music? What do you turn to when the creative well runs a little low?
The Australian outdoors. When the inspiration isn't flowing, I'll usually take a break from production for weeks at a time. When it starts to feel as though I'm forcing it, my creativity dies quickly. I lack the tendency to methodically grind it out.


What is your opinion on the ever-spreading sub-genre vine? Are there too many? Do you think there' s perhaps a sub-genre that doesn't get the attention it deserves?
You would think with such diversity, artists would be able to choose something that reflects their tracks. It's often not the case. Look how distorted the perception of progressive house is from one venue to the next. Do we need guidelines? Or should Soundcloud increase the character limit for genre specification?
"Slightly progressive, kinda melodic tech house with war horns that sounds like techno but has random hats so is probably tech house".


Studio work and music creation or performing and interacting with a live audience, what do you prefer?
At this point in time. Music creation, the satisfaction of other artists playing and appreciating your music is unbeatable.


As a music artist, it becomes apparent that there is a huge difference between the art and the business. Is there anything about the music scene that you would personally change?
The Australian scene is in serious danger right now. NSW mostly. Over policing and ridiculous regulations are being imposed on events. Personally I'd like to see the decriminalisation of possession, universal pill testing at festivals and the discontinuation of sniffer dogs, for the safety of punters.

And less day time disco at Victorian festivals. Fuck disco.


Any new or upcoming artists on your radar? Who shouldn't the world sleep on?
Mha Iri is the next Alex Stein. Watch her closely and check out her latest EP, it's unbelievable.

Also, heavily underrated names that'll be big players in the scene soon are Unknown Concept, Ebony Willis and Sion. I expect my brother to take the scene by its technological balls in the coming years too.


What can we expect from you in the near future? Any upcoming projects or gigs in the pipeline that you would like to tell us about?
I have a number of original projects in the works. If I can be patient enough to not release them individually...... Realistically I should be putting them towards my first EP release.


Famous last words?
“Disco free Australia for 2020”




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Friday, 13 September 2019

INTERVIEW // We have a chat with DONZ about his life in music



Arsen Bekechyan «DONZ aka A.B.T», DJ/ Producer began his professional career as a DJ in 2007. In 2010 Arsen started writing/producing electronic music, where he focus on making Deep,  Afro and Tech House. He has released songs with some major labels, such as Pipe & Pochet, Dialtone, Art Vibes, Take Away, Ritual Records, Monza Ibiza, Dialtone Records, Sudam Recordings, Ready Mix Records, Baikonur, Not For Us, Berlin Aufnahmen, Bedroom Music, Kitchen Recordings and more…

Donz is now the owner of “ Fantastique Sound Records ”. His label has worked with a number of artists, like Robert Babicz, Roy Rosenfeld, Oliver Deutschmann, Betoko, Phonique, Sergey Sanchez, Ryba Kate and Skif. He is considered to be the organiser for a number of electronic music festivals, such as Area 51, Echo "The Sunset", Contact, The Future generation, Evolution ½ and Hi-Voltage.

We were lucky enough to get the chance to ask him a few questions and listen to his latest track.

Tell us about your earliest musical memory?
When I was little, I had a tape recorder that I made audio recordings on, after which I got a computer and started creating. For me, these were the golden years.


At what point in your life did you have that moment where you said to yourself "This is it. This is the type of music I want to create?"
Two years ago I chose my style of music.


Please list some of the most influential albums on your creative outlook and output:
This would be;
Killer Maschinen (Which was 10 years ago) and Dle Yaman


What key pieces of gear/software are you using to define your sound?
I use a number of things in my music, such as duduk, arp, guitars, and aura sounds that I record myself.


What inspires you outside of music? What do you turn to when the creative well runs a little low?
My family inspires me a lot.


Studio work and music creation or performing and interacting with a live audience, what do you prefer?
Both at the same time, but there comes a time when without creation I feel incomplete.


As a music artist, it becomes apparent that there is a huge difference between the art and the business. Is there anything about the music scene that you would personally change?
Each person perceives music in his own way, each has his own taste and his own genre for music.


What can we expect from you in the near future? Any upcoming projects or gigs in the pipeline that you would like to tell us about?
This year and next year, I will release new albums and singles with different labels from across the world.


Famous last words?
Good things happen




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Thursday, 12 September 2019

INTERVIEW // We got the chance to speak to Beije and find out what makes them tick



"Beije" is a producer/DJ duo based in Toronto, Canada. They began releasing music together in 2018 and signed to labels such as Manual Music, Manual Deep & Nugget Music. Their sound can be described as a blend of hypnotic rhythms and melancholic melodies coming together to create unforgettable moments on the dance floor.

We were lucky enough to get the chance to talk to Beije and ask them a few personal questions.

Tell us about your earliest musical memory?
Playing the saxophone in the elementary school band.


At what point in your life did you have that moment where you said to yourself "This is it. This is the type of music I want to create?"
In 2015, we attended a music festival planning on staying at the mainstage all day but we ended up venturing to the side stage. Here we were introduced to Pete Tong & Deep Dish. The exact moment we realized "this is it", was when Pete dropped "Constellations" by Camelphat. After this experience, we became indulged in the underground scene and everything it has to offer.


Please list some of the most influential albums on your creative outlook and output:
Some of our most influential albums are: Berlin Calling by Paul Kalkbrenner, Assume Form by James Blake, and Mourn by Corbin.


What key pieces of gear/software are you using to define your sound?
We are using Ableton Live for our productions. Some of our go-to gear has got to be our beloved Moog Grandmother and Roland TR-8.


What inspires you outside of music? What do you turn to when the creative well runs a little low?
We think inspiration comes from everywhere, but whenever we running low on creative juices we can always count on going to our favourite club to hear something unique and refreshing that inspires us.


What is your opinion on the ever-spreading sub-genre vine? Are there too many? Do you think there' s perhaps a sub-genre that doesn't get the attention it deserves?
We don't see the harm in the ever-spreading sub-genre vine, at least it means people are being innovative. However, we think to stay in one sub-genre for too long kind of ruins the positive effect because it gets harder to be innovative the longer you stay. Also, we feel disco doesn't get the attention it deserves.


Studio work and music creation or performing and interacting with a live audience, what do you prefer?
We definitely prefer studio work and music creation, no rules or regulations!


As a music artist, it becomes apparent that there is a huge difference between the art and the business. Is there anything about the music scene that you would personally change?
Personally, we don't see much wrong with the music scene. We surround ourselves with like-minded individuals who share the same passions and dedications.


Any new or upcoming artists on your radar? Who shouldn't the world sleep on?
2 artists who have been on our radar are B.A.X. and Renga Weh. We discovered them through Manual Music and have been fans ever since!


What can we expect from you in the near future? Any upcoming projects or gigs in the pipeline that you would like to tell us about?
We have some strong independent releases lined up through 2020, as well as remixes and guest mixes for some of our favourite labels!


Famous last words?
So let's go.



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Wednesday, 11 September 2019

INTERVIEW // We got the incredible opportunity to chat to Nachap and listen to his latest song


Nachap was born in Barcelona and has established himself as one of the young talents within the Techno scene in his city. After working for the last decade training in the experimentation of sound, he has reached the musical structure that he was looking for in his most personal project.

With 17 years of experience in producing electronic music, he has gone through some genres like Drum & Bass, Jungle and then he broke into the electronic music scene. He is known for generating a magical vibe with the crowd in his live shows, adapting the set to the different scenarios in which he deals with during performances. His technique and knowledge of music gives his productions a style that can be defined as a fusion of organic elements, like the ones that nature offers us, and old school analogue sounds. This exciting mix that sounds emerges is influenced by more than a decade loving the "rave" and "underground" cultures.

We got to have a chat with Nachap and ask him a few questions about his life in the music world.


Tell us about your earliest musical memory?
First of all, thank you very much for having me.

Well, it’s not easy to remember a particular memory since I‘ve been listening to a lot of music of different styles during all my life,  but I could name the first powerful memory I have, and that’s when I first heard Shy FX & UK Apachi 'Original Nuttah'... years later I bought the vinyl record and it would become a fixture in my Drum’n bass sets.


At what point in your life did you have that moment where you said to yourself "This is it. This is the type of music I want to create?"
I have always tried to produce music that I could later play on in my sets and that has defined the type of music that I’ve been producing until today. There is not a moment in which you say: This is it! I think that over the years you are maturing technically and this leads you to have the clearest ideas and to define the type of music you want to create.


Please list some of the most influential albums on your creative outlook and output:
1997 - The Prodigy - The Fat Of The Land

2016 - Affkt - Son Of A Thousand Sounds

2019 - Maceo Plex - Mutant Series


What key pieces of gear/software are you using to define your sound?
I use Ableton Live, several UAD plug-ins, Omnisphere, Diva, a Roland tr-09 and a Moog Minitaur among others. But I think what could define my sound is more related to the workflow than to the equipment that I use to produce. I like to experiment with sounds, I used to play with the send outputs to modulate all the tracks and I try to humanize my music by quantifying as little as possible.


What inspires you outside of music? What do you turn to when the creative well runs a little low?
Over the years I have learned that taking breaks is very important since monotony is one of the worst enemies of creativity. It helps me a lot to listen to other styles of music, watch videos on YouTube from artists that I like or just go for a walk and get some air.


What is your opinion on the ever-spreading sub-genre vine? Are there too many? Do you think there' s perhaps a sub-genre that doesn't get the attention it deserves?
Personally I don't care too much. I don't notice those things. I think music is not like mathematics and does not have to be typecast in a genre or subgenre. If a track is good I doubt that anyone cares what genre it is, right?


Studio work and music creation or performing and interacting with a live audience, what do you prefer?
I love both... but if I have to opt for one I choose live performances. I have to say that I was a DJ and over the years I gradually got into the fantastic world of production.


As a musician, it becomes apparent that there is a huge difference between the art and the business. Is there anything about the music scene that you would personally change?
As we have been saying from 'Vondreib', (the record label that I own with my partner L.O.W.E.R) is that social networks are an indispensable tool for brands like ours to have visibility, even if you do a good job of content you can reach a very positive and a real social impact for the brand. But it is undeniable that there is a big problem, social networks are a garbage can where everything goes, and what happens is that the good work of many people (because there is) is overshadowed by stupid content and low-level brands of the sector.


Any new or upcoming artists on your radar? Who shouldn't the world sleep on?
Vondreib does a great job in this research. We are a record label that loves music above all and we put a lot of energy into the young talents that make up our team so I invite you to keep an eye on the next releases because they are so strong!


What can we expect from you in the near future? Any upcoming projects or gigs in the pipeline that you would like to tell us about?
At the end of 2019 I embark on a new parallel path to Nachap, under the name of 'no_ip', my new A.K.A with which I will get my first reference in Clash Lion, the label lead by Shall Ocin, Daniel Watts and TERR ... Truly that’s a project that excites me a lot!

On the other hand, as Nachap I have three releases from here until May 2020 and several scheduled performances so we will not stop!


Famous last words?
Work, work and keep working...



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Tuesday, 10 September 2019

INTERVIEW // Catching up with DJ/Producer Andrea Carrozza



Born in Italy, Andrea Carrozza is a House, Afro House and Techno DJ/Producer currently based in Zurich, Switzerland where he grew up. Having gotten his start while still attending school at the age of fourteen, Andrea has always been drawn to electronic music genres.

Completely self-taught, he has learned through experience as well as trial and error, using the numerous musicians who have inspired him as a springboard for learning and exploring.

We got the chance to speak to Andrea and found out a little more about him.

Tell us about your earliest musical memory?
The first time I was inspired was when Cedric Zeyenne, a Swiss producer and friend, brought me into his Studio when I was 13. It fascinated me and the atmosphere struck me! Since then I was so inspired that I started by DJing for the first time.


At what point in your life did you have that moment where you said to yourself "This is it. This is the type of music I want to create?"
I was very into EDM in the beginning. In 2013 I started experimenting with different genres and I discovered my passion for Afro House. Since then I’ve been focusing more on music. It took me two years to create that brand known as Andrea Carrozza.


Please list some of the most influential artist on your creative outlook and output:
Steve Angello, Eric Prydz, Daft Punk, Black Coffee are my biggest inspirations.


What key pieces of gear/software are you using to define your sound?
I often use my old baby Virus TI to create the sounds on my tracks. To fix and edit the sounds I use UAD plug & wave plug-ins and I really love the new Slate Digital software.


What inspires you outside of music? What do you turn to when the creative well runs a little low?
I am very inspired by travelling, I like to see other cultures and discover places. This affects my music in different ways. I sometimes sit in the studio and experiment with different sounds and local artists I discover around the world, which in turn motivates and inspires me again.


What is your opinion on the ever spreading sub-genre vine? Are there too many? Do you think there' s perhaps a sub-genre that doesn't get the attention it deserves?
Everything has his positive and negative aspects, but I think it is more on a positive note because it gives more possibilities for artists and listeners to focus towards one specific genre they like. For me personally, I don't  think there can be too many genres, because music is one language.


Studio work and music creation or performing and interacting with a live audience, what do you prefer?
For me as an artist it is important to be active in the studio, because this helps me to create music and strengthen my brand. Playing live in front of an audience gives me the possibility to show the world what I created and interact with them, so I guess if I would have to choose between the two I would say performing with a live audience.


As a music artist, it becomes apparent that there is a huge difference between the art and the business. Is there anything about the music scene that you would personally change?
Art and business are strongly related in the music scene. You have to be your own business to share your art to the right people.


Any new or upcoming artists on your radar? Who shouldn't the world sleep on?
Myself ;)
I think there are many good artists, however, I am focusing on my own brand at the moment. Through my label AVES I give the artist the opportunity to share their music.


What can we expect from you in the near future? Any upcoming projects or gigs in the pipeline that you would like to tell us about?
You can expect a lot of new music in the next months. To be up to date be sure you follow me on the social media platforms.


Famous last words?
Talk less, do more!



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Monday, 9 September 2019

INTERVIEW // We chatted to the Afro House king SURAJ about his processes, inspirations and gear.



After making his debut in Nairobi, SURAJ has emerged as a dynamic, trailblazing DJ/Producer in East Africa. Since then, he has set his sights on becoming a beacon for Africa's burgeoning electronic music scene.

Since 2017, SURAJ has been touring more extensively with performances at two of the leading electronic music festival in East Africa; Nyege Nyege Festival in Jinja, Uganda and at Kilifi New Year in Kenya.

In 2018, he toured Europe in the Summer performing at Watergate in Berlin at their RISE: African House Music event and at the CityMatine Festival in Budapest as well as debuts in Vienna, Austria. Luanda, Angola & Dubai, UAE

SURAJ was also part of the Boiler Room True Music Africa - Nairobi show in May 2018. A surreal moment for him, he got to showcase his talent to the world, receiving critical acclaim. He was also a part of the All-Star line-up at the 10th Anniversary of Kenya’s premier music festival; Blankets & Wine in November 2018.

Following the release of his hit remix of ‘Abiro’ with Riot Stereo in 2016, SURAJ has been on a roll, releasing music with Red Bull Music [SURAJ - Cape Town Whispers (EP)], MoBlack Records [SURAJ & Max Doblhoff feat. Alai K - Bana Bana (EP)] and SURAJ - Wawere (Da Capo Remixes) on Gondwana Records, which peaked at #2 on the Traxsource Afro-House chart.

SURAJ has also recorded mixes and podcasts for RISE (Berlin), Red Bull Radio and Madorasindahouse (MIDH) as well as featuring on Smirnoff Vodka’s Battle of The Beats Campaign & CNN’s African Voices.


We chatted to him about his processes, inspirations and gear;

Tell us about your earliest musical memory?
My earliest musical memory would have to be watching my father play the Tablas, a classical Indian percussion instrument. The music played while I was growing up comes second to mind.


At what point in your life did you have that moment where you said to yourself "This is it. This is the type of music I want to create?"
There have been records I have been inspired by that made me realize I would like to create a certain type of music. One that stands out would have to be hearing Salif Keita's classic Madan as well as watching Tiesto perform at the 2006 Olympics.


Please list some of the most influential albums on your creative outlook and output:
Three of the most influential albums would have to be Sunlounger's debut album Another Day On the Terrace. Tiesto's classic compilation In Search Of Sunrise Volume 7 and quite recently South African DJ & Producer Da Capo's Indigo Child album that was  released in late 2017.


What key pieces of gear/software are you using to define your sound?
My production setup is fairly simple. I use a Mid-2012 Macbook Pro with Logic 9 and stock plugins + Waves Bundle Only. I utilize recording artists with a standard Behringer B-1 condenser microphone and I use Genelec 8010s studio monitors. I am most comfortable with this setup and I look forward to adding more bits of gear to my army soon. Gear wishes; a Roland HPD-20 Hand Percussion.


What inspires you outside of music? What do you turn to when the creative well runs a little low?
What really inspires me and helps me recharge creatively would have to be travelling. Experiencing new and old places really helps me to get creative, inspired and exhilarated. I am also very fortunate to live in a country like Kenya that has an infinite amount of beautiful places to visit and experience.

What is your opinion on the ever spreading sub-genre vine? Are there too many? Do you think there's perhaps a sub-genre that doesn't get the attention it deserves?

My opinion on the sub-genre vine is exactly your next question. I think there are too many of them and we get so caught up in labelling music instead of experiencing and enjoying it as it was intended to in the first place. There is nothing wrong in labelling music but I feel we shouldn't get too caught up in finding a word that can describe it :)


Studio work and music creation or performing and interacting with a live audience, what do you prefer?
This question is literally a rock and a hard place for me. I personally enjoy all aspects of it. From creating the music to tweaking, releasing and performing it to an audience. I am very fortunate to be able to create and perform my own music almost week in/week out, and it really helps me find a direction with the music I am creating.

As a music artist, it becomes apparent that there is a huge difference between the art and the business. Is there anything about the music scene that you would personally change?

If there was one thing I could change personally about the music industry, I would find a way to make it easier for artists from my region to travel abroad to perform at clubs and festivals. If I could, I would find a way to eradicate visas and their bureaucracies.


Any new or upcoming artists on your radar? Who shouldn't the world sleep on?
There is never a list long enough to highlight great upcoming artists but here are a few on my mind; TNS Music & Vanco from South Africa, El Mukuka from Zambia & Kenyan vocalist Idd Aziz.


What can we expect from you in the near future? Any upcoming projects or gigs in the pipeline that you would like to tell us about?
Lots to expect from my end in terms of music and shows! This year I have been fortunate to travel and perform in places like Nigeria, South Africa & Dubai and I am really looking forward to performing in Angola, Portugal & Morocco this year too. Musically I have just released an EP with Max Doblhoff & Senegalese Kora legend Baboulaye Cissokho titled Dimbale on Angolan label Seres Producoes. I have an upcoming remix for the amazing Emmanuel Jal & Abdul Gadir Salim's Baai with Riot Stereo out soon on Moblack Records as well as a very special Various Artists compilation called Sounds Of Sasaab with my company Midi Minds Kenya & Greek label Madorasindahouse.

Sounds Of Sasaab is a project that aims to capture and highlight the identity of the Samburu tribe in Kenya in the form of a song based sample pack, a documentary and a Various Artists compilation inspired by the samples with productions from artists such as Da Capo, Laolu, Armonica & many more.


Famous last words?
I will quote the legendary Roy Hargrove "If you take care of the music, the music will take care of you"



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Friday, 6 September 2019

INTERVIEW // We get to know the incredible Beyhude on a personal level



Beyhude (Umut Çağdaş Coşkun) is an audio addict who creates vibes for relaxed minds and has been interested in music since his childhood. He's tried hip hop, blues, ambient and experimental music, and currently producing electronic dance music. He believes that emotion is the spirit of music and if you can feel, you can dance.

We talk to him for some insight into his world….


Tell us about your earliest musical memory?
I was an absolutely hip hop-head in my childhood. (Still, I am) I made my first hip-hop instrumental when I'm 15. Then I wrote lyrics mad tried to rap on it. That was my first musical production. I have no record of it, but I can still remember it's melody.

At what point in your life did you have that moment where you said to yourself "This is it. This is the type of music I want to create?"
Maybe this moment will never come. I'm interested in a wide range of music as a listener or a producer. I think every moment is an "aha moment" when it comes to creating unique things.

Please list some of the most influential albums on your creative outlook and output:
Albums I can say in a snap:  Islandman's Rest in Space, Bob Moses's All In All, Da Poet's Beat Tape, Brian Eno's Apollo, Nicola Cruz's Cantos de Vision and All India Radio's Echo Other.

What key pieces of gear/software are you using to define your sound?
Emotion over groove. I'm using a variety set of VST's and sound packs to create the ambience. Everything else is about experimenting.

What inspires you outside of music? What do you turn to when the creative well runs a little low?
I'm interested in drawing but I can't. Maybe I can give it a try.

What is your opinion on the ever-spreading sub-genre vine? Are there too many? Do you think there' s perhaps a sub-genre that doesn't get the attention it deserves?
Music is as old as human history. There were no genres with sharp borders like now, before the music become an industry. I think we need genres to define listeners' ear taste, not the music's itself. It's a market adaptation. There are too many songs. Genres are filtering mechanisms for our ears.

Studio work and music creation or performing and interacting with a live audience, what do you prefer?
Both. Studios for creating them, live performing for feeling them.

As a music artist, it becomes apparent that there is a huge difference between the art and the business. Is there anything about the music scene that you would personally change?
When it comes to electronic dance music, there are too many unnecessary de-facto industry laws. Tempo, composition, sounds you use, the ambience you create. These are not for my music.

Any new or upcoming artists on your radar? Who shouldn't the world sleep on?
Nhii is my favorite in these days.

What can we expect from you in the near future? Any upcoming projects or gigs in the pipeline that you would like to tell us about?
I'm preparing an EP named "Alabora". It is a thematic EP and contains two songs: Alabora (capsizing) and Okyanusun Kalbi (heart of the ocean). I can't wait to share it with people. Maybe it will contain remixes by my friends.

Famous last words?
If you can feel, you can dance.



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